Call your doctor if you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider for medical advice.

What is COVID-19 and How Does it Spread?

Symptoms of Coronavirus:

Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness.

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness.

These symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Think you might have COVID-19?
CLICK HERE to Self-Check Yourself

How is Coronavirus Spread?

COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly through close contact from person-to-person in respiratory droplets from someone who is infected. People who are infected often have symptoms of illness. Some people without symptoms may be able to spread virus.

COVID-19 is a new disease and we are still learning about how it spreads and the severity of illness it causes.

Person-to-person spread

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.

    • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
    • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks.
    • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
    • Some recent studies have suggested that COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms.

Maintaining good social distance (about 6 feet) is very important in preventing the spread of COVID-19.

Spread from contact with contaminated surfaces or objects

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes. This is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads, but we are still learning more about this virus.

Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub. Also, routinely clean frequently touched surfaces.

How easily the virus spreads

How easily a virus spreads from person-to-person can vary. Some viruses are highly contagious, like measles, while other viruses do not spread as easily. Another factor is whether the spread is sustained, which means it goes from person-to-person without stopping.

The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading very easily and sustainably between people. Information from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic suggest that this virus is spreading more efficiently than influenza, but not as efficiently as measles, which is highly contagious.



 

How to Protect Yourself and Others from COVID-19:
Illustration: woman sneezing on man

    • There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
    • The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.
      • The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person
      • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
      • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks.
      • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
      • Some recent studies have suggested that COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms.

More details: How COVID-19 Spreads

Person with cloth face covering

Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others

  • You could spread COVID-19 to others even if you do not feel sick.
  • Everyone should wear a cloth face cover when they have to go out in public, for example to the grocery store or to pick up other necessities.
    • Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
  • The cloth face cover is meant to protect other people in case you are infected.
  • Do NOT use a facemask meant for a healthcare worker.
  • Continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.

Amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo issued an Executive Order requiring all people in New York to wear a mask or a face covering when out in public and in situations where social distancing cannot be maintained, such as on public transportation.
The Executive Order went into effect on Friday, April 17th.

MAKE YOUR OWN FACE MASK WITH THESE  STEP-by-STEP INSTRUCTIONS

WHEN WEARING CLOTH FACE COVERINGS, NEW YORKERS SHOULD:

o  Make sure that they fit snugly and cover their nose and mouth.
o  Be changed frequently and laundered when they are soiled or wet.
o  Not become complacent with other protective measures.
o Do not touch the cloth covering or face.
o Continue to be vigilant with thorough and frequent hand washing.
▪ Soap and water, or alcohol-based hand sanitizer of 60%+ alcohol.
o Practice respiratory etiquette and cover your coughs or sneezes.
o Practice social distancing – even when wearing masks.
o Stay home and help flatten the curve!

Visit NYSDOH COVID-19 webpage for more information at:
– www.ny.gov/coronavirus
– DOH_COVID19_ClothMasks_040820

 

Illustration: washing hands with soap and water

Clean your Hands Often

  • Clean your hands often
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
Illustration: Woman quarantined to her home

Avoid close contact

 

woman covering their mouth when coughing

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • If you are in a private setting and do not have on your cloth face covering, remember to always cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
cleaning a counter

Clean and disinfect

don't share

Avoid sharing personal household items

  • Do not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people in your home.
  • Wash these items thoroughly after using them with soap and water or put in the dishwasher.
cleaning a counter

Clean all “high-touch” surfaces everyday

  • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces in your “sick room” and bathroom. Let someone else clean and disinfect surfaces in common areas, but not your bedroom and bathroom.
  • If a caregiver or other person needs to clean and disinfect a sick person’s bedroom or bathroom, they should do so on an as-needed basis. The caregiver/other person should wear a mask and wait as long as possible after the sick person has used the bathroom.
  • High-touch surfaces include phones, remote controls, counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables.
  • Clean and disinfect areas that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them.
  • Use household cleaners and disinfectants. Clean the area or item with soap and water or another detergent if it is dirty. Then, use a household disinfectant.
    • Be sure to follow the instructions on the label to ensure safe and effective use of the product. Many products recommend keeping the surface wet for several minutes to ensure germs are killed. Many also recommend precautions such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.
    • Most EPA-registered household disinfectants should be effective. A full list of disinfectants can be found hereexternal icon.


What to Do if You’re Sick:

Call your doctor:  If you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider for medical advice.

Call 911 if you have a medical emergency: If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the operator that you have or think you might have, COVID-19. If possible, put on a face mask before medical help arrives.

Steps to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 if you are sick

Follow the steps below:  If you are sick with COVID-19 or think you might have COVID-19, follow the steps below to care for yourself and to help protect other people in your home and community.

man in bed

Stay home except to get medical care

  • Stay home. Most people with COVID-19 have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. Do not leave your home, except to get medical care. Do not visit public areas.
  • Take care of yourself. Get rest and stay hydrated.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Be sure to get care if you have trouble breathing, or have any other emergency warning signs, or if you think it is an emergency.
  • Avoid public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.
family separated

Separate yourself from other people and pets in your home

  • As much as possible, stay in a specific room and away from other people and pets in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available. If you need to be around other people or animals in or outside of the home, wear a cloth face covering.
  • See COVID-19 and Animals if you have questions about pets.
taking temperature

Monitor your symptoms

  • Common symptoms of COVID-19 include fever and cough. Trouble breathing is a more serious symptom that means you should get medical attention.
  • Follow care instructions from your healthcare provider and local health department. Your local health authorities may give instructions on checking your symptoms and reporting information.
When to Seek Medical Attention

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

Call 911 if you have a medical emergency: If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the operator that you have or think you might have, COVID-19. If possible, put on a face mask before medical help arrives.

on the phone with doctor

Call ahead before visiting your doctor

  • Call ahead. Many medical visits for routine care are being postponed or done by phone or telemedicine.
  • If you have a medical appointment that cannot be postponed, call your doctor’s office, and tell them you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the office protect themselves and other patients
father playing with his son

How to discontinue home isolation

  • People with COVID-19 who have stayed home (home isolated) can stop home isolation under the following conditions:
  • If you will not have a test to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:
    • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (that is three full days of no fever without the use medicine that reduces fevers)
      AND
    • other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
      AND
    • at least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared
  • If you will be tested to determine if you are still contagious, you can leav e home after these three things have happened:
    • You no longer have a fever (without the use medicine that reduces fevers)
      AND
    • other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
      AND
    • you received two negative tests in a row, 24 hours apart. Your doctor will follow CDC guidelines.

In all cases, follow the guidance of your healthcare provider and local health department. The decision to stop home isolation should be made in consultation with your healthcare provider and state and local health departments. Local decisions depend on local circumstances.


When to Seek Medical Attention

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

Call 911 if you have a medical emergency: Notify the operator that you have, or think you might have, COVID-19. If possible, put on a cloth face covering before medical help arrives.




New York State on PAUSE

10 Point Plan

Governor Cuomo announced the “New York State on PAUSE” executive order, a 10-point policy to assure uniform safety for everyone.

The 10-point NYS on PAUSE plan is as follows:

    1. Effective at 8PM on Sunday, March 22, all non-essential businesses statewide will be closed;
    2. Non-essential gatherings of individuals of any size for any reason (e.g. parties, celebrations or other social events) are canceled or postponed at this time;
    3. Any concentration of individuals outside their home must be limited to workers providing essential services and social distancing should be practiced;
    4. When in public individuals must practice social distancing of at least six feet from others;
    5. Businesses and entities that provide other essential services must implement rules that help facilitate social distancing of at least six feet;
    6. Individuals should limit outdoor recreational activities to non-contact and avoid activities where they come in close contact with other people;
    7. Individuals should limit use of public transportation to when absolutely necessary and should limit potential exposure by spacing out at least six feet from other riders;
    8. Sick individuals should not leave their home unless to receive medical care and only after a telehealth visit to determine ifTo leaving the home is in the best interest of their health;
    9. Young people should also practice social distancing and avoid contact with vulnerable populations; and
    10. Use precautionary sanitizer practices such as using isopropyl alcohol wipes.

EN ESPAÑOL

The maximum fine for violations of the state’s social distancing protocol is $1,000.

 



Dryden and Other Local Resources



COMMUNITY FOOD RESOURCES:

There are many local resources to ensure everyone in our community is able to obtain food and nourishment during the ongoing Coronavirus Pandemic

 



Emergency Fire and Ambulance Services:

A Message from Dryden Ambulance and Neptune Hose Fire Department Confirming that Emergency Fire and Ambulance Services are Available and at the Ready During Coronavirus Pandemic and Shutdown:



VOLUNTEER:

    1. Food Bank of the Southern Tier
    2. Human Services Coalition
    3. Mutual Aid Tompkins
    4. COMMUNITY FOOD DISTRIBUTION
    5. HEALTH/COMMUNITY CARE
    6. Make FACE MASKS
    7. FOOD DRIVES
    8. Mutual Aid Tompkins

PUBLIC NOTICES:

      1. PARKS CLOSED: http://dryden.ny.us/2020/03/31/parks-closed-to-protect-public-health/
      2. COVID-19 Pandemic Safety Practices & Resources for Dryden and the Surrounding Area: http://dryden.ny.us/2020/03/27/covid-19-pandemic-safety-practices-resources/
      3. Coronavirus (COVID-19) Information and Resources
        1. https://hsctc.org/coronavirus/

 



Coronavirus (COVID-19) Information and Resources


COVID-19 response:

Need information? View the following Cornell CALS and CCE Resource Pages Updated Regularly

General Questions & Links:

https://eden.cce.cornell.edu/

Food Production, Processing & Safety Questions:

https://instituteforfoodsafety.cornell.edu/coronavirus-covid-19/

Employment & Agricultural Workforce Questions:

http://agworkforce.cals.cornell.edu/

Cornell Small Farms Resiliency Resources:

https://smallfarms.cornell.edu/resources/farm-resilience/

Financial & Mental Health Resources for Farmers:

https://www.nyfarmnet.org/

Cornell Farmworker Program

www.farmworkers.cornell.edu

www.trabajadores.cornell.edu (en espanol)



SOURCES:

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/index.html
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/index.html
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/steps-when-sick.html
  4. https://www.ny.gov/coronavirus
  5. https://hsctc.org/coronavirus/